Phil Teaches COPE in Ardmore

The Arbuckle Area SHRM chapter and the Southern Oklahoma Leadership Luncheon came together Jan. 12th to host LRI President Phil Wilson, as he addressed the core leadership skill of follow up and follow through. Phil led the group through one of the learning modules of the Approachable Leadership Learning System, and taught the COPE method – Capture, Organize, Prioritize, and Execute.

Kentucky Goes Right-To-Work

To quote out-going president Obama, “elections have consequences.”

With Republicans winning the Kentucky senate and general assembly for the first time in decades, Governor Matt Bevan was presented with House Bill 1 to sign into law this week. The bill will move right-to-work in the Bluegrass State from the county-by-county affair that had brought right-to-work to more than a dozen counties to freedom for all within the state.

Labor Relations INK December 2016

In this issue:

Big Labor Perplexed Is A Dangerous Pension Bailout Precedent On The Way? Auto Workers Fail to Represent Strategy+Tactics Insight, SEIU Watch, Scoreboard and more…

The bottom of each story contains a link to the individual post on our site.

 

http://lrionline.com/labor-relations-ink-december-2016

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How a Trump Administration Could Fix the NLRB

Bob Dylan may have skipped the Nobel Prize ceremonies, and I doubt he’ll be at the inauguration, but I’m sure he’d agree that “the times, they are a changin.”

In just a few days Donald Trump will be inaugurated as America’s 45th President. His transition has felt a lot like his campaign: unconventional, messy, and always interesting to watch.

The list of things Americans want the incoming Trump administration to fix grows longer each day. My guess is aren’t up there at the top of the list of priorities. But I do think there are

Continue reading Labor Relations INK December 2016

Labor Relations Insight December 2016

by Phil Wilson How a Trump Administration Could Fix the NLRB

Bob Dylan may have skipped the Nobel Prize ceremonies, and I doubt he’ll be at the inauguration, but I’m sure he’d agree that “the times, they are a changin.”

In just a few days Donald Trump will be inaugurated as America’s 45th President. His transition has felt a lot like his campaign: unconventional, messy, and always interesting to watch.

The list of things Americans want the incoming Trump administration to fix grows longer each day. My guess is aren’t up there at the top of the list of priorities. But I do think there are BIG (or should I say huge) opportunities to improve the way the NLRB does business.

I’d like to take this opportunity to suggest four things the new administration should add to the priorities list. Most of these could be implemented right away and

Continue reading Labor Relations Insight December 2016

Union Bailout Update

The 5th Circuit court has granted the DOL’s request for an expedited review of the DOL’s appeal of the nationwide injunction against the overtime rule. The injunction was ordered by a District judge in Sherman, Texas in late November, as the rule was due to take effect on Dec. 1. Briefs are due by the end of January, and oral arguments will be scheduled after that date.

Judge Cabranes

Judge Cabranes

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld the Speciality Healthcare micro-units decision, and provided an additional framework for application. Judge Jose Cabranes, writing for the court, explained the two parts as (a) identifying shared interests among members of the petitioned-for unit, and (b) explaining why excluded employees have meaningfully distinct interests…that outweigh similarities with unit members. To

Continue reading Union Bailout Update

Big Labor Perplexed

Having thrown $530 million of workers’ dues into mostly Democratic Party groups and liberal causes over a four-year period, only to see barely half of union households voting for their candidate in the recent election, union leaders seem to be flailing around in a state of confusion. Now they can’t decide if Trump’s efforts to keep U.S. jobs from crossing borders should be applauded, and they can’t even agree to support former Big-Labor darling Tom Perez in his bid as chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

On the one hand, it’s quite entertaining to see Big Labor stumbling around attempting to collect itself. On the other hand, one must not overlook what unexpected actions a bear backed into a corner might take. They could still make life miserable for some!

SEIU Watch

SEIU members in a school district in Michigan are being sued by the SEIU Local over the ownership of a banquet hall. The employees of the Taylor school district had built the hall with money secured via fund raising efforts (as opposed to union dues), prior to a merger of the Taylor local with an SEIU local in Lansing. What happened?

Typical SEIU strong-arm tactics. The Taylor employees decided they wanted to undo the 10-year-old merger with the Lansing local and remain a distinct SEIU local, but the Lansing local didn’t want to want to play nice. Kathie Fields, former president of the Taylor union local, and a defendant in the lawsuit, sent a petition with nearly 400 signatures to the International headquarters, asking the International to dissolve the merger or send legal help. After this request was ignored, a 200-signature petition was sent to the Michigan Employment Relations

Continue reading SEIU Watch

Is A Dangerous Pension Bailout Precedent On The Way?

Unions have been allowed to operate by a set of rules that if used by any other enterprise, would land the executives of those enterprises in prison. A common example is the immunity from violence allowed by unionistas during strikes, protests and other “protected concerted activities.”

For the most part, unless you are a target for such violence, this disparity doesn’t affect you. However, perhaps a more dangerous rule immunity applies to the math that unions are allowed to use in managing (or mis-managing) their pension funds.

Non-union private pension plans must use a government-prescribed and realistic interest rate when managing their funds. Unions are under no such restrictions and may use whatever interest rate assumptions they want when running their pension plans.

umwa-logoAs the recent Mine Workers of America

Continue reading Is A Dangerous Pension Bailout Precedent On The Way?

Teamster Beat

fred-zuckerman

Hoffa rival Fred Zuckerman

Last month, we reported that James P. Hoffa managed to secure the role of president of the Teamsters union for his 18th consecutive year. While this win does show that Hoffa still has some power plays up his sleeves, the election itself proved that he may not be able to hang on for much longer.

Not only did he lose his “home local” this year, he only beat rival Zuckerman by 709 votes. It’s starting to become painfully clear that Teamsters members are ready for a change.

In other news, after only 15 months of representation, Goodwill truck drivers and warehouse workers are ready to decertify Local 839. Why? Because their local didn’t get anything done. Goodwill addressed many employee issues

Continue reading Teamster Beat

Strategy+Tactics

A new report released earlier this month by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Workforce Freedom Initiative shows how the NLRB’s 2011 decision authorizing “micro-unions” has spread across industries.

The Specialty Healthcare decision “abandoned decades of precedent regarding what is an ‘appropriate’ bargaining unit for forming a union.” At the time of the decision, the NLRB said the ruling would likely only apply to non-acute healthcare facilities and “did not constitute a broad new legal standard.” However, as this new report shows, these micro-unions are being formed across a variety of industries including retail, manufacturing, rental cars, delivery services, and telecommunications.

workit-app

Unions are finding new leverage at the tactical level as well, using everything from app technology to alt-labor organizing to increase their organizing capacity and political punch.