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Labor Relations Ink June 2017

In this issue:

Mafia/Union Ties Still Strong Union Wrestling Match Pensions On The Ropes Insight, SEIU Watch, Fight for $15 and more…

The bottom of each story contains a link to the individual post on our site.

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Labor Relations Insight by Phil Wilson

Three Things Congress Can Do to Fix Labor Law Today

It’s been another month and we remain not one step closer to a Republican majority National Labor Relations Board. I suppose you could say the Administration took a quarter-step when it announced this week its “intention to nominate” Marvin Kaplan to the Board. That’s a quarter-step in the right direction, but a better step would be officially nominating both Kaplan and Bill Emmanuel, so that the Senate can start the

Continue reading Labor Relations Ink June 2017

Labor Relations Insight

by Phil Wilson Three Things Congress Can Do to Fix Labor Law Today

It’s been another month and we remain not one step closer to a Republican majority National Labor Relations Board. I suppose you could say the Administration took a quarter-step when it announced this week its “intention to nominate” Marvin Kaplan to the Board. That’s a quarter-step in the right direction, but a better step would be officially nominating both Kaplan and Bill Emmanuel, so that the Senate can start the process of getting them confirmed.

Due to the congressional calendar (and the likelihood Democrats will be playing the four-corners offense the next two years) it’s all but certain that the we won’t have a Republican majority before the August recess. And there is no guarantee that Phil Miscimarra will continue on as

Continue reading Labor Relations Insight

Union Bailout Update

Alex Acosta

The DOL under new head Alexander Acosta has withdrawn two memos (or administrative interpretations) originally posted by the Wage & Hour division related to independent contractor and joint employer status. Although such action does not change any law, it does signal the administration’s possible intention to backtrack up the slippery slope of joint employer issues.

The administration also revoked a 2013 Letter of Interpretation which allowed non-employee union members to attend OSHA inspections, even when no employees at the targeted company were represented by a union.

The DOL has also signaled that it intends to revoke the Persuader Rule, publishing a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that will take public comment on rescinding the rule altogether.

Acosta apparently

Continue reading Union Bailout Update

Fight For $15

Senator Pelosi

Lead organizer for the “Fight for $15” movement was caught needing to put a foot in his mouth. After spouting that he doesn’t get paid for attending protests, it came out that he does. In fact, in 2016, he was paid more than $146,000 by the Service Employees Union. Hmm.

Despite revelations like the one above, the movement itself is still making headway across the country. State lawmakers in Illinois approved a plan to increase the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour over five years.

Massachusetts, on the other hand, hasn’t committed to a $15 minimum wage just yet, but if you were to ask Senate President Stanley Rosenberg, we may as well all start planning on it now. He

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Wilson Quoted Regarding Persuader Rule

In a June 9 article on the Persuader Rule, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) reached out to LRI president and general council Phil Wilson for comment. Phil reminded the readers that although the rule is under an injunction, it is also technically in effect, and the only way to be “completely the rule goes away” is another rule making.

The Office of Labor-Management Standards posted notice in the Federal Register to rescind the rule, and the comment period is now open. Check here or on the image below for details and to post comments.

 

Labor Relations INK May 2017

In this issue:

Make It Go Away AFL-CIO Skews the Facts Union Money Shell Game Fight For $15 Insight, Scoreboard, Sticky Fingers and more…

The bottom of each story contains a link to the individual post on our site.

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Labor Relations Insight by Phil Wilson

Can We Confirm a Board Already?

This is getting pretty frustrating.

Believe me, I understand that the labor relations tail is never going to wag the dog of any new administration. And to be fair, it took President Obama more than a year to get his first two NLRB seats filled (with the controversial recess appointments of Craig Becker and Mark Pearce). But still.

As far as labor law goes we are currently in the 9th year

Continue reading Labor Relations INK May 2017

Union Bailout Update

Alex Acosta

At the end of April, the Senate confirmed the appointment of Alex Acosta as Labor Secretary. Acosta replaced initial nominee Andrew Puzder, who withdrew his name from consideration amidst controversy surrounding the hiring of a housekeeper not authorized to work in the U.S., and mishandling the taxes related to her employment.

The Trump administration forwarded the names of two attorneys for background checks, in preparation for appointment to fill the vacant slots on the National Labor Relations Board. Marvin Kaplan is an attorney for the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, an independent federal agency that hears cases involving alleged workplace safety violations and adjudicates disputes between the Labor Department and employers. He previously served as the Republican workforce

Continue reading Union Bailout Update

Fight For $15

A push to increase the minimum wage in Louisiana failed in a Senate committee. The state’s minimum wage will remain at $7.25/hour for now. Workers in St. Louis, however, had a different outcome earlier this month.

On May 5th, a $10 minimum wage went into effect for all employees working at least 20 hours per year inside St. Louis city limits; this, after a circuit court lifted the 2015 injunction on the city’s minimum wage ordinance.

A Republican bill in Maine that allows employers to pay less than the minimum wage to workers who make up the difference in tips received bipartisan support earlier this month with a vote of 11-2.

Meanwhile, workers are suing the DNC for failing to pay minimum wage and denying compensation for overtime. Interesting, considering the Democratic platform for a $15 minimum.

Labor Relations INK April 2017

In this issue:

UFCW Reveals Strategy for 2017 Union Leaders & Money – A Bad Combination No Opting Out Allowed Taxpayers Pickpocketed By Unions Sticky Fingers, SEIU Watch, Insight and more…

The bottom of each story contains a link to the individual post on our site.

 

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Labor Relations Insight

by Phil Wilson

My 10 Top Takeaways from CUE

I am flying back today from the 40th anniversary CUE conference. If you aren’t a member of CUE you are really missing out. It is simply the best conference around for people focused on creating positive workplaces. I enjoyed presenting on two panels around the future of work. And today I had the honor of teaching some incredible leaders the ins and outs of Approachable Leadership.

The

Continue reading Labor Relations INK April 2017

Union Bailout Update

T-Mobile President John Legere

In 2015, T-Mobile established an employee-representative group as a way of securing feedback from front-line employees. The company credited T-Voice, as it called the group, for such changes as free Wi-Fi, mobile phone charging stations, and spa days. The Communication Workers of America (CWA) filed a ULP, and an NLRB judge upheld the charge, claiming the group “unlawfully establishes and maintains a dominated labor organization.” T-Mobile President John Legere has blasted the ruling and declared his intent to fight it.

The NLRB struck down another arbitration agreement. This time the board did not rely on D.R. Horton because there was no explicit provision in the agreement that limited class or collective actions. As the National Law Review article outlines, the agreement was struck down because

Continue reading Union Bailout Update