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Thanks for helping businesses understand the deceptive practices of the unions and their coercion
K. Parson

Very interesting. I like what you have to point out and await the information disc.
T. Eby

thank you for good information,
J. Schulz

Labor Relations INK April 2017

In this issue:

UFCW Reveals Strategy for 2017 Union Leaders & Money – A Bad Combination No Opting Out Allowed Taxpayers Pickpocketed By Unions Sticky Fingers, SEIU Watch, Insight and more…

The bottom of each story contains a link to the individual post on our site.

 

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Labor Relations Insight

by Phil Wilson

My 10 Top Takeaways from CUE

I am flying back today from the 40th anniversary CUE conference. If you aren’t a member of CUE you are really missing out. It is simply the best conference around for people focused on creating positive workplaces. I enjoyed presenting on two panels around the future of work. And today I had the honor of teaching some incredible leaders the ins and outs of Approachable Leadership.

The

Continue reading Labor Relations INK April 2017

No Opting Out Allowed

Unions spend millions of dollars each year on politics – no surprise there. As the National Institute for Labor Relations Research (NILRR) reported, Big Labor spent $1.7 billion in the 2016 election season. What is troubling is where unions secure the money it spends on politics. According to Mark Mix of the National Right to Work Committee, $1.3 billion came from general treasury funds. This is where union dues goes upon being siphoned from employee paychecks.

In over half of all states now, union members are supposedly able to “opt-out” of paying any fees to the union for anything except representational activities on their behalf. In reality, all of their “fees” for such work go into the general pot, and the union spends it as it sees fit, even if against the political wishes of those fee payers.

This short article uses the AFSCME LM-2 recently filed to

Continue reading No Opting Out Allowed

Labor Relations INK March 2017

In this issue:

It’s All Academic AFL-CIO Headquarters Staff Dwindles Longshoremen Union Out of Step with Membership Insight, Fight for $15, SEIU Watch and more…

The bottom of each story contains a link to the individual post on our site.

Labor Relations Insight

by Phil Wilson

The Clash, The Beatles and Lafe Solomon

Radio DJ Wolfman Jack

The Supreme Court at last issued its decision in National Labor Relations Board v. SW General, Inc. The Court found that Lafe Solomon’s stint as Acting General Counsel to the NLRB violated the Federal Vacancies Reform Act (“FVRA”). While Chief Justice Roberts took pains to make clear its decision is not “the son of Noel Canning” it at least qualifies as a first cousin.

Unless you have

Continue reading Labor Relations INK March 2017

Right To Work

Right-to-Work has gained quite a bit of momentum in recent years, up from 22 states and 41% of the nation’s population living in right-to-work jurisdictions in 2011 to 28 states and 52% of the population today.

Additionally, House Republicans introduced the National Right-to-Work Act in early February. This act would “repeal federal labor law provisions that permit firing workers who refuse to pay union dues.” While similar bills have been introduced in the past, this is the first time it’s been done while the GOP hold control of the White House and both houses of Congress.

Similarly, we’ve been seeing success on the local level. For example, before right-to-work became state law in Kentucky, twelve counties had already passed some form of right-to-work provisions. Those provisions were upheld by the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals late last year.

Labor Relations INK – February 2017

In this issue:

Union Membership Drops Yet Again Just Another Lazy Union Afternoon… Union Pension Turmoil Insight, Right-to-Work, Sticky Fingers and more…

The bottom of each story contains a link to the individual post on our site.

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Labor Relations Insight by Phil Wilson

Is there a “Trump Effect” on Union Organizing?

Just about every call I’ve had since Donald Trump’s November surprise gets around to THE question. Will Donald Trump’s election mean the end for labor unions? Or will unions rise like a phoenix from the ashes and organize like never before as a reaction to the new administration? Or maybe something in between?

I’ve mostly answered this question the way lawyers tend to answer questions (sorry): “It depends.” But we are now beginning to get some data that is shedding light on the “Trump Effect” on labor unions. And for unions the data is not looking good.

First,

Continue reading Labor Relations INK – February 2017

Right To Work

On Feb 6th, Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens signed a Right-to-Work bill into law, making Missouri the 28th state to adopt the measure and leaving Illinois now surrounded by right-to-work states. According to Jim Schultz, the former director of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, over 1,100 businesses have black-listed Illinois because it is not a Right-to-Work state. Big Labor has vowed to block the measure by seeking a public referendum. The AFL-CIO teamed up with the NAACP to file the petition paperwork and begin the signature gathering process.

New Hampshire was not so lucky, as a Right-to-Work measure in that state failed to pass by a margin of 200-177 in the state house. The Republican-controlled body then voted to ban

Continue reading Right To Work

Labor Relations INK January 2017

Union Membership Shrinks Again! New App for Bargainers and Union Members Union Leadership Manipulation of Election Results Another Innovation Stifled by Big Labor SEIU Watch, Insight, Scoreboard and more…

The bottom of each story contains a link to the individual post on our site.

http://lrionline.com/labor-relations-ink-january-2016

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Labor Relations Insight

by Phil Wilson

How carefully do you craft messages to your employees? Have you ever announced something and then wished you’d said it a different way?

We recently ran across a messaging document posted on Facebook originally produced by the PR firm Park Street Strategies for the United Food and Commercial Workers. (Memo to self: The Google sees ALL the web pages).

According to their 2015 LM-2, the UFCW payed

Continue reading Labor Relations INK January 2017

Right To Work

We mentioned on Jan 10th that Kentucky wasted no time passing right to work legislation. Missouri and New Hampshire are cuing up to follow Kentucky.

Wisconsin has been fighting off challenges to its recently enacted right-to-work law, and in December one of the law’s provisions met a legal challenge it has yet to surmount. At issue was the more generous dues check off provision. Wisconsin’s law provides that an employee is permitted to revoke wage deduction authorization for union dues at any time after providing employer 30 days’ written notice. Federal regulations under the Labor Management Relations Act permits unions to bargain for dues checkoff authorizations that are irrevocable for one year. Judge William Conley of the Western District of Wisconsin found that the LMRA preempted the state law. The Wisconsin Department of Justice is considering appealing the ruling.

 

Kentucky Goes Right-To-Work

To quote out-going president Obama, “elections have consequences.”

With Republicans winning the Kentucky senate and general assembly for the first time in decades, Governor Matt Bevan was presented with House Bill 1 to sign into law this week. The bill will move right-to-work in the Bluegrass State from the county-by-county affair that had brought right-to-work to more than a dozen counties to freedom for all within the state.

Right To Work

Taking right-to-work up a notch, Alabama and Virginia will strive to become the eleventh and twelfth states to protect right-to-work into their state constitutions in November. The two states have had right-to-work laws in place for decades. Arkansas was the first state to enshrine right-to-work in its constitution in 1944, and Oklahoma the most recent in 2001. Business leaders in Alabama, which has twice the union density as its neighbors, believes the state must protect right-to-work to remain competitive and to attract additional auto and aerospace manufacturing jobs.